Netflix’s time-traveling See You Yesterday is an instant classic

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Netflix’s time-traveling See You Yesterday is an instant classic

PEYTON NEWMAN, REPORTER

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Netflix’s latest original release See You Yesterday provides the perfect combination of sci-fi and drama in this Back to the Future meets The Hate U Give flick.

The film follows the path of two scientifically-gifted high school students, CJ Walker (Eden Duncan-Smith) and Sebastian Thomas (Dante Crichlow), as they attempt to use their new-found time-travelling technology to save CJ’s brother Cal from being shot by the police.

The plot draws many similarities to 2018’s The Hate U Give, highlighting themes of racial tension and injustice as seen across America, while providing a sci-fi spin that also questions the ethics and implications of scientific advancement.

Originally released in 2017 as an independent short-film directed by Stefon Bristol, the movie was produced as full-length feature in early 2019. The project is produced by film legend Spike Lee (Do The Right Thing) and 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks.

The film retains its original director, Hollywood new-comer Stefon Bristol. The movie was also adapted from the short-film and written by Bristol and Fredrica Bailey.

At the center of the film are actors Eden Duncan-Smith (Annie) and Dante Crichlow as main characters CJ Walker and Sebastian Thomas respectively. Both are reprising their roles from the 2017 short-film. The film also features X-Factor star Stro and Michael J. Fox (Back to the Future).

With a big-budget makeover to the short-film, Bristol was able to bring his vision to life through costumes and CGI technology. Inspired by Back to the Future, main character CJ Walker’s red jumpsuit and overall aesthetic echoed that of Marty McFly.

Through expertly placed CGI technology as opposed to copious use, See You Yesterday is able to craft a modern sci-fi film without overpowering the societal significance of the plot or the on-screen chemistry of Duncan-Smith and Crichlow.

Even with expert casting, production, and significance, many viewers were left disappointed by the films portrayal of police brutality in predominantly black areas.

This expertly crafted sci-fi comedy/drama is a perfect movie for all ages to enjoy from its time jumping hijinks to analysis of current societal issues.